• YOU entertain ME!

    While I wait for Warren Ellis to hurry up and finish FREAKANGELS, I need something to read, so I'm recuriting all our Carpe Chaos fans to make me comics!

    You've seen it before, take these three panels, write me a punch line, see if I laugh:

    That fish is just begging a punchline

    And if you want to make your own bubbles, here's a blank version:

    Post a link to it in the comments below, Facebook it to Carpe Chaos, twitter mention me or @CarpeChaos, or send it to us with our contact form, and we'll post your comic here on the blog!

    Commence your humor! Oh yeah, make me laugh out loud, and you get a free t-shirt.

    -Eric

  • Carpe Chaos News Roundup (June 25th, 2011)

    Hey the approximately 40 people that read this blog! How are you doing? Good, good, glad to hear it. You may have noticed that the front page of CarpeChaos.com has changed to emphasize the comic that's currently being updated. That means that we'll be using the blog for the sorts of news updates that used to be on the front page. Here are a plethora of such updates:

    • Did you notice the new front page? It's new! Right now it's got an image to let you know about the latest page that's been posted, but it's actually one of those slideshow deals that you've probably seen on other sites. The plan is, eventually, to populate the slide deck with more than a single slide. Then it will become exponentially more cool! We're still working on making the slides.

    • Eric's design-a-drink contest is still going on. If you haven't seen his blog post and want to win a free Carpe Chaos t-shirt, you can check out the details here.

    • San Diego Comic Con (July 20-24) is coming up! We'll be at small press table L-6! We'll be there with everything in our store and more! We're actually printing some limited edition, convention-exclusive floppy issues of Jailing Fortune #1 and #2. The prep work is done, so if the printer meets the deadlines we'll have them! Please stop by and say hello!

    • Carpe Chaos will be at APE in San Francisco in October, and at Comikaze Expo in Los Angeles in November. I've updated the conventions page with the dates and I'll update it again when the tables are assigned. We hope you'll come and see us!

    • Rising Up chapters 4 and 5 have been added to Graphicly. Here's a link to chapter 4, and here's a link to chapter 5. A fair few people have checked out our comics on Graphic.ly so far, but nobody's bought any of the 99-cent Rising Up chapters yet. I'm still waiting to see whether anyone will...

    • Graphic.ly has made it so you can embed their web-based comic viewer on any other website. It's cool, I guess. Here's an example:

      We already have our own Flash viewer and our own HTML/Javascript viewer (and people on our facebook page say they prefer ours anyway) so it's not something we'll be using. It's a neat idea, though.

    • The full script for Rising Up has been added to our new wiki. Here's a direct link to the script. All of our scripts except for Jailing Fortune and The Myth of Midigan are now on the wiki, and we're probably going to wait for those stories to conclude before uploading them (so as not to spoil the endings). We're working on preparing more of our background material for the public wiki and should have some new articles up soon!

    • People really liked the guest page we made for Amya, which is a testament to Daniel Allen's artistic abilities. I've uploaded the two guest pages we've created so far to a new folder on our DeviantArt page. Our gallery on DeviantArt has grown pretty large over the past year, so if you haven't seen it now would be a good time to give it a gander.

    • Just a heads up about our planned schedule (which is totally subject to change): Next month's chapter will be the second chapter of The Myth of Midigan, and during August we're planning on showcasing Jailing Fortune's chapter 3. Both stories are about to get a lot more exciting!

    -Jason

  • Drawing Joe's Portrait
    Joe's final portrait (click for larger)

    Hi everyone!

    I'm Shoham "Leo" Charikar. I've done some early concept art and minor miscellaneous stuff for Carpe Chaos, the most recent of which is a series of caricatures/portraits of the AWESOME individuals who are the Carpe Chaos team: [link]

    These portraits were made per Jason's initiative and with about two hours time constraint per piece, though on average they ended up taking less than that. Experimenting with some desktop-recording software, I was able to record a glimpse into my process on Joe Slucher's portrait, and would like to share that with you today. The video speeds through 39 minutes of the coloring process, which was the bulk of the work. I hope you enjoy!

    Cheers,

    -Leo

  • Guest comic for Amya

    We (Daniel Allen and myself) made a guest comic for Amya! Here it is:

    Our guest comic for Amya


    It just went up on their site too. Our imagined scene takes place at the end of chapter 2, and Kaden's line at the end is a reference to what he says on this page in the main Amya story. Amya is made by Savannah Houston-McIntyre, Andrew Hewitt, and Rebecca Gunter (more info), and it's really good! You should check it out!

    -Jason

  • Carpe Liquor: The Carpe Chaos Bartender Challenge

    The moment I saw this sunrise I knew it belonged in a whiskey tumbler:

    Click for high res!

    Or maybe a martini glass? Whatever! It's got to happen! This page deserves to have a drink styled after it! If you're a bartender, or just a lover of beautiful libations, we want to send you a t-shirt!

    Mix up a drink that reminds us of this page of Jailing Fortune and we'll give you a choice of any t-shirt in our store!

    Start with a Kerouac cocktail to get the orange sunset? A dash of Parfait d'Amour to capture the purple stones? A dash of whipped cream in "vrrrrm" shapes? You decide! Feel free to make it virgin, too!

    Send us a picture of your drink, its name, your recipe, and your t-shirt size and we'll feature your drink on our blog!

    -Eric

  • Hey guess what, we have a wiki now!

    We have an official Carpe Chaos Wiki! Yeah! How about that! Here's more in the form of a news article:

    Carpe Chaos Launches Wiki with Pages from Project Bible

     

    Santa Cruz, California — June 7th, 2011 — Carpe Chaos, a web-based science fiction comic series, today launched a new project to share more of their massive universe with fans. Presented as a fan-editable wiki, the new site features in-depth articles detailing the religion, government, native environment, and anatomy of several of their original alien races as well as the original scripts for most of their comics.

    "We've spent more than five years developing the universe behind our stories, and while our growing library of comics continues to reveal more about the Carpe Chaos universe, we felt that publishing 15-30 new pages of comics each month wasn't accomplishing this fast enough," said Jason Bane, Carpe Chaos's editor and a contributing writer. "We wrote some of these articles back in 2006 and 2007 when we were still dreaming everything up, and we're really excited to be sharing a lot of the material we've accumulated."

    The front page of the new Carpe Chaos wiki.
    The front page of the new Carpe Chaos wiki.

    The story scripts have been published with minimal clean-up. Eric Carter, the creative director for Carpe Chaos, had this to say: "We value transparency, and this is just another way to show our fans more of our creative process. I mean, between Twitter, Facebook, DeviantArt, and our blog posts about how we create, people should be able to get a pretty clear picture about how we do things. We hope it helps other artists, and that it's at least a little interesting for everyone else."

    The articles concerning the universe background, however, are anything but unpolished. They are written as formally as an encyclopedia, and the level of detail is surprisingly high. One article describes the home world of the Kaeans, who live on the ring of a large, gaseous planet, and it goes so far as to invent a new term for "planetary ring particle," which is "oursal." The article covering the government system of the Porgs is about 20 pages when printed, more than double the length of the US Government article on Wikipedia. Bane claims to have over 1500 pages of articles and notes, if they were all printed on paper.

    But how can a comic series like Carpe Chaos build suspense if their universe is an open book? In a word: redaction. "There are certain universe features and plot points that of course we can't reveal yet," said Carter. "Some of them are cool things we've designed that we want to reveal in our comics, like the Porg PC. We showed the holographic screens in Rurban Sprawl, Hard Lessons, and Door to Door, but fans didn't get the full picture until chapter 2 of Jailing Fortune. Likewise, a lot of our universe history will be used as plot points in future comics. We can't give away everything!

    "So what we did was, we saw how government security agencies redact phrases, sentences, and paragraphs that the public isn't allowed to know by coloring them solid black, and we decided that was a pretty good system." Carpe Chaos has already begun redacting sensitive information, but they promise to go back and reveal what's hidden in the blacked-out sections when the information is no longer secret.

    Bane points out that an editable wiki could be dangerous if vandals attempt to alter the Carpe Chaos universe to break its self-consistency. And then there's the concern over copyright and intellectual property ownership. How can Carpe Chaos maintain the rights to their creative work if fans are able to edit or even add to the project bible? "We've thought a lot about those things," said Bane, "and we've done two things to address them. The first is to protect our background articles by using a citation system. Basically we create two versions of each reference article, a protected version and an editable version.

    "The editable version can change and grow if fans want to contribute by expanding on certain things or adding references to our comics, but the 'source' article is locked so it can be referenced and cited in the editable version. This way if someone tries to create a new race of aliens or add humans to the universe or something, others can ask for citations and eventually remove the offending information if it can't be verified.

    "The second thing we've done is establish the policy that Carpe Chaos has the rights to all work submitted on the wiki, and that all work submitted must either be original, copyrighted by Carpe Chaos, or in the public domain. It's the cleanest way to do it because just like we don't want to inadvertently steal work from others, we don't want people to rewrite something about our universe and then claim it as their own."

    Bane and Carter aren't sure if this system of releasing official project bibles will catch on, but they hope so. "We know it won't be for everyone," Bane said. "We think most of our fans will read our comics and then wait for the next one. But for people like us that like to really dig deep into a universe, we've got it all written down."

    And what's next for Carpe Chaos? According to the creators: more comics, more background articles, more iPhone/iPad comics, a table at Comic Con San Diego in July, and a new book. Said Bane, "we've got something like 238 pages of full-color comics at this point and we want to build a compilation that's even longer than our first book, Carpe Chaos Ignition. We got a really great response to Ignition so we want to make something even bigger, probably by building support through Kickstarter or Indiegogo."

    Carpe Chaos is an independent, web-based, science fiction comic series about five alien races who learn to travel between stars, and it focuses on the ways their cultures collide and how they work to solve their problems. New pages are released at least every other day, and each new chapter completes on the first of every month.


    -Jason

  • My comic review checklist, Part 3: Art

    Someone's already done the work to explain why checklists are important, even for advanced tasks like open-heart surgery and the like, so why not comics? I was so all over this from the beginning! Making checklists is, like, in my blood. Anyway, part one of the checklist is here and part two of the checklist is here. And now, the thrilling conclusion to my three-part checklist!

    This checklist covers everything everything non-word-related that I look for when I'm reviewing and proofing the comics. Nagging worries like "are there small mistakes?" are things I am constantly checking for as I stare at each page, but as a contrary example it's embarrassing the number of times we've forgotten to put the logo on the cover, and then gone back and changed it. A lot of this stuff has become automatic for me but I still review it every so often to make sure I'm not forgetting important stuff. And this is all important stuff when we're trying to make every page as good as it can be! (Don't tell me that many people only spend a few seconds reading each comic page. I might cry.) As before, just click on the example images to see the final version in our comics.

    Jason's Art Checklist

  • Does anything stick out of the panels that shouldn't?

  • When we make a check for this we like to say we are conducting a "border patrol." Both the artist and myself spend time making sure that there are no digital layer mistakes and no stray marks on the pages, because accidental stray marks or special effects that bleed into a gutter or another panel are ugly! The examples below show just two of the bleeding panels I found when developing Moments of Elation with Eric and Anthony. Since then we learned a valuable lesson: make the gutters their own layer and put that layer above every other layer possible.

        
    • Does the art look correct? Are there small mistakes?

    • It's funny how having odd-looking artwork can distract a reader, especially when it's mostly at a higher level of quality EXCEPT for the one or three things that look off. Luckily this one comes naturally for me. I stare at everything, make sure everything looks right, and nit-pick. I don't think I have OCD but there's a certain part of me that breathes a metaphorical sigh of relief whenever things that were askew somehow are set right. I'm addicted to those small moments of satisfaction. This is probably why I'm an editor, now that I think about it.

    • Are all of the aliens anatomically correct?

    • We spent years, and I mean like 3+ years developing the Carpe Chaos universe before even attempting to make our first comics. I mean model sheet after model sheet after model sheet for each of the 5 main alien species (and even more minor ones), not to mention the architecture and the technology and everything else. We've figured out some pretty exact specifications for things, and now it's time to stick to them. Having the model sheets makes it easy to check for inconsistencies, but the reason we went to all the trouble is to create a fully immersive world where the number of arms and eyeballs stays the same is so people can actually learn the universe and what it looks like. Differences due to style are fine of course, but anatomical mistakes? Not allowed!

          
      </td>
    • Is the art style consistent?

    • Not between stories, obviously, and sometimes not even within a story. But where appropriate, a story's style should remain consistent with itself. If one of the elements doesn't match the established style it stands out even more than a perspective or anatomy mistake. Sometimes things should stand out that way, but when it brings out something that it shouldn't, the style of the offending object or area has to be knocked back in line. Example:

    • Is everything consistent between panels on a page, and with other pages?

    • Oh my gosh! Consistency! If there is the one thing I strive for above all else, it's making sure mistakes like the ones in the examples below don't happen. Did that building just change shape? Did that glove magically change color? In styles where colors and shapes aren't supposed to shift around, well, I do my best to ensure they don't. This sort of thing is easier to spot when looking at a single page, but for me it's important to read through the whole comic carefully as the pages are finalized because pages are developed weeks apart from one another and it's easy to "drift" from the planned color and design details as we work.

          
    • Are objects, people, and landscape features like plants, buildings, and heavenly bodies in the same positions from panel to panel and page to page?

    • More consistency checking! Colors and shapes aren't the only things that "drift." Objects themselves move around too! Figuring out things like lighting and tree positions can be a lot of work. Sometimes it almost feels like we are making an animation with all of this detail. But it allows the reader to mentally construct the setting of each scene much more naturally when the stationary objects remain stationary, and it's that smooth reading experience that we strive for.

          
    • Do the full bleeds go to the edges of the "digital book" and not into the spine, against the adjacent page?

    • Many advantages come with making digital books. Printing is easier, for one. But even more interesting is that we can play with the space on TWO pages instead of just one. Making two-page spreads is pretty cool, and when used properly they can carry a powerful weight with them. Two-page spreads command a reader's full attention because that's all the reader can see at one time. It's like a full-screen video game. All distractions are eliminated. Here are a couple of examples:


      But, when working on individual pages, it's easy to forget that most of them will be set side-by-side in two-page spreads. A lot of the layout and spread planning should already be done by this point, but one of my pet peeves is full bleed pages that bleed into the spine. So far we've done it twice and both times I hated that we could have avoided such simple mistakes by catching them sooner. Most people don't care as much about this, and these "errors" even help readers of our digital comics remember that yes, there is a virtual spine dividing the two pages. But whenever I think back to the layouts that I would like to have done differently, these are always the first two things I wish I could go back and change. I'm kind of surprised I'm even pointing them out to everyone, but here goes. Being open and honest on the blog. Okay. Here they are:


      Aah! Aah! Stop looking at them already! Please move on to the next item in the checklist!
    • Do the line weights all look about right?

    • It depends on the style, but most comics have line art. And most comics with line art make the lines different thicknesses and styles. This line thickness is called "line weight." Generally outlines are thicker and the inner lines and detail lines are thinner. The thicker the line, the more attention it will attract. Artists use these thicknesses to make a scene easier to understand, and they have to work with the colors on the page. I'm no visual artist, but I can at least point out areas where they don't seem right, or don't match other similar line weights. This item on the checklist is mostly to help me to pay attention to the lines used on each page, because this is the single thing that I most often forget to pay attention to.

    • Is the Carpe Chaos logo on the cover?

    • No images for this one. Like I said at the top of this post, we often forget to add the logo to the cover. Some cover logos stand out more than others, but each of our covers has our logo on it somewhere. I'm pretty sure the Hard Lessons and Jailing Fortune covers were both first posted without our logo on them, and probably a couple of others. Oops! We're all good now, though. All set. You can even go and check.

    Universe

    This isn't really on the checklist, but it's still something we are pretty darn careful about. Eric is responsible for maintaining universe consistency, but I do my best to back him up because I'm the person most familiar with the Carpe Chaos universe after him. Most of it is worked out when we write the stories, but our scripts often leave many of the visual details up to the artists. There isn't much more to this than paying attention and fact-checking with our notes on the wiki whenever something seems amiss, though some things are easier to spot than others:

    Additional Note

    Scott McCloud's books Understanding Comics and Making Comics were incredibly instructive and influenced both the items in this list and how I think about them, so if you're considering making comics for the first time I can't recommend them enough.

    -Jason

  • A Comic Is Born, Part 4: Contents May Shift In Transit

    The last post in this series wasn't so hard to write. It was an opportunity to throw up some of our in-progress images and document what we've been doing for 4 years.

    This post however... makes me feel rather inadequate. Just last night I was staring blankly at 45 Photoshop pages that refused to do anything but kick my ass over and over. It reminded me that in an area that I should be nailing down to a science... I'm still basing most of what I do on superstitions. 
     
    And so I present to you, the first 9 months of my adventure in Image Mastering. 

     

     
    So you'll need to take this post with a grain of salt. Do what works for you, and if you find strong evidence that I'm wrong, please tell me in the comments so I don't keep making the same mistakes! 
     
    That said, it seems straight forward enough: you're just saving out jpegs right? But the reality is a that it's a multi-disciplinary technical endeavor with a dozen things that can go wrong.
     
    "Image Mastering" is the name I've given to the last step of our comic creation process. It involves bringing all the art, text, and technology behind Carpe Chaos into one cohesive whole. The end goal is to ensure that all our hard work comes through in the most absolute crystal-clear perfection that we can muster. I'll hit each area that I've identified individually, and I think that will highlight how many ways this process can go wrong.

    Color Profiles

    Have you ever looked at the sky and wondered if the color you call blue is the same color that someone else sees? It's puzzled philosophers for centuries.

    But have you ever looked at your computer monitor and wondered if the shade of blue you see is the same as someone's else monitor? The answer is a clear no. 

    Everyone's monitor shows different colors. Because it's a different model, or its settings are set differently, or even for no other reason than it's older. Colors fade in monitors just like they do in clothes. Once you throw an image out on the Internet you don't have any precise controls over how it looks on the other end, but you can keep the colors consistent before you actually put it out there, which will improve what the viewer sees regardless of how bad their monitor is.

    The way you do that, is adopting what's called a "Color Managed Workflow".  The gist of it is that you can set all the computers that work on your image to use a specific color profile, and that will help maintain consistency whenever your file is opened. Think of a color profile as a gigantic 32 million color paint pallete. (Or something like always using paints from the same manufactuer and batch number.)

    Color profiles are a whole topic on their own, and I can't tell you everything there is to know about it. In fact, I can't really add anything to the discussion that G. Ballard hasn't already said. He'll teach you everything you want to know and back it up with live examples.  I'm just here to tell you that you should do it. ;)

    If G. Ballard is tl;dr, just change your Photoshop settings to match mine:

    Too lazy to read G. Ballard's guide, but you had enough energy to check the alt text?

     

    Make sure all the computers that edit your art have the same settings, or you'll have problems.

    A quick note about sRGB and the web.

    sRGB is the defacto standard for color profiles on the web. Like any good dictator, there's no way around the iron fist of sRGB. Don't forgot to convert your images to sRGB before you publish them online, or work in sRGB to begin with. In Photoshop CS3+, the Save For Web And Devices... dialog will automatically convert your images to sRGB.

    Automatic Color Calibration

    When I started to learn about color profiles and the differences between monitors, I started to think "Wouldn't it be cool if I had this robot... and this robot had a big specialized eye on the front, and he could walk up to my monitor and stare intently at it for a few minutes and then whisper delicately to my monitor until its contrast and color balance were just right? I mean... it would be cool if I had a robot that didn't do any of that. He could just stand around looking roboty."

    This is exactly what I was expecting when I opened the Spyder 3 box.
    Tripod Backhoe from Untold the card game. http://www.untoldthegame.com/

    My hopes of such a device sailed when I heard that a Spyder 3 Color Calibrator was available for an attainable price. We bought one. I unwrapped it. I was disappointed that it didn't spin silicon webs. Alas.

    I calibrated my laptop and the change was very noticable. Then I calibrated my desktop monitor, and everything looked purple.

    So I had to do a bunch more research and I learned what a color calibrator was actually doing. The reason my monitor looked purple was because I had left a flourescent light on while calibrating (and Spyders HATE flouresent lighting).

    I also learned that our eyes are really spectacular at adjusting for unusually colored light, and even if our monitor has an odd tint to it, we eventually adapt to the shift. Most color problems aren't about your colors being too blue, or too red, or too green, they're about the colors not being evenly spaced, or spread out wide enough. The reality is there isn't an Ideal Blue or Canonical Red, or even a Pure White that you can standardize on.

    As I understood color more I began to realize the oversimplified view I had taken. Photographers spend their entire careers chasing the perfect hue, and color calibrators are actually designed to make your monitor look a much like an image printed on paper as possible. The only reason for this is that you can control an image on paper. If I print something out and hand it to you, I know it looks the way I want it to because I can see it before I show it to you. So my life is easier if my monitor looks like the paper I'm going to print on.

    Unfortunately the Internet doesn't work that way. I don't get to see what my image looks like on your monitor. It doesn't matter the slightest whether my monitor looks like what my printer prints... 'cause I never print any of this stuff.

    So was the Spyder a waste? Nah, it solves some obscure problems with our brightness, and it fixed some very poorly calibrated monitors, and it certainly improved the color on our printed posters that you should buy from our webstore. Truth is, it's a good deal for what it is, but if your monitor isn't calibrated by a sweet robot buddy, you can still get by without it.

    Resolution

    At Carpe Chaos, we've always had plans to put our comics as anthologies in printed books, so that's limited the aspect ratios we can choose from.

    On the web, there are a bazillion options, columns, horizons, and stuff that's not possible on paper, but books can only be a few inches by a few inches, and if you want to do graphic novels on the cheap, you should print two copies on a single press sheet. Press sheets are the big pieces of paper that book printers use, so if you print two books on one sheet, you can cut them apart and dramatically cut down your printing costs, so your book will be about 5" x 7.5", the standard size for Manga.

    That said, the actual resolution you display your comics at should be decided by your reader's screen size. If you're publishing on the web, and not doing some kind of sidescrolling comic like The Pale, your horizontal resolution should be limited to 1024, cause people HATE horizontal scrolling. More than 99% of our readers have a screen width of 1024 or larger, and over half of those who don't are on iPhones, which have browsers that cope well with pages that are wider than their screen. Add a little space for scroll bars and margins and 900 pixels wide is a safe bet.

    Since there's no standard resolutions to follow on the web, we decided that we wanted a resolution targeting displays capable of showing 1080p video, since those displays are likely to become more common in the future. However, having a giant 1920x1080 comic is too big for smaller screens, so we also create a 1280x720 version of the comic. 1280x720 is just big small enough to fit on most laptop screens, but it's a very tight squeeze, and if the reader has any toolbars installed in their browser, their screen won't be big enough. If we started over again, we'd choose a smaller resolution. Maybe 900x680.

    I really appreciate the way Earthsong uses a resolution of 500x694, so as you read through the pages you don't have to scroll in ANY direction. You can just leave your mouse in one place and click "next" over and over.

    Compression

    There's really only two choices on the web for comics, jpeg and png. PNG will look better, but the file sizes can be enormous. If your pallete is simple, you might be able to get away with using PNG, but for the rest of us, jpeg compression is the only acceptable choice.

    When using JPEG on the web, it's important to turn off Chroma Subsampling, which is the ugliest part of JPEG compression. In Photoshop's "Save As.." dialog that means you need a quality setting of 6 or more, and in the "Save For Web..." dialog that means you need a quality settting for 51 or higher. Other programs usually offer a checkbox that controls whether Chroma subsampling is on or off.

    Batch Automation

    The length of this post testifies to how many things need to be taken into consideration every time we make a page of Carpe Chaos. Keeping track of all this would be an enormous burden if we had to do it by hand. Sort of like catching catchfish with by hand. 

    Accessible in Photoshop under Window-->Actions, Photoshop's Action tools can record anything photoshop does, and with the File-->Automate-->Batch command, you can run the same action over and over on any number of files.

    To make a new action, just hit the record button:

    The record icon is that red circle.

    Then do whatever you want to be in the action, then hit the stop button:

    The stop button is that teal square.

    You can even record other actions being played, which lets you create common functions to be used in multiple actions.  Here're the actions I use to mater the pages of our comic:

    Carpe Chaos has a bajillion different actions required to master it's comics.

     

    And that's it. I queue up all the pages in the chapter, run the batch operation, and get myself a sandwich. Before long, the comic is born.

     

    -Eric

    Last month's post on the art of
    our comic wasn't so hard to write. It was an opportunity to throw out some of our in-progress images and document what we've been doing for 4 years.
     
    This post however... makes me feel rather inadequate. Just last night I was staring blankly at 45 Photoshop pages that refused to do anything but kick my ass over and over. It reminded me that in an area that I should be nailing down to a science... I'm still basing most of what I do on superstitions.
     
    And so I present to you, the first 6 months of my adventure in Image Mastering. 
     
    So you'll need to take this post with a grain of salt. Do what works for you, and if you find strong evidence that I'm wrong, please tell me in the comments so I don't keep making the same mistakes!
     
    That said, I've spent dozens of hours researching this, and I've been doing it for the last 6 months, so unless you're professionally trained, you should probably just shut up and do it the way I say. :) It's a topic that seems straight forward enough: you're just saving out jpegs right? But the reality is a that it's a multi-disciplinary technical endeavor with a dozen things that can go wrong.
     
    Image Mastering is the name I've given to the last step of our comic creation process. It involves bringing all the art, text, and technology behind Carpe Chaos into one cohesive whole. The end goal is to ensure that all our hard work comes through in the most absolute crystal-clear perfection that we can muster. I'll hit each area that I've identified individually, and I think that will highlight how many ways this process can go wrong.
     
    Last month's post on the art of our comic wasn't so hard to write. It was an opportunity to throw out some of our in-progress images and document what we've been doing for 4 years.
     
    This post however... makes me feel rather inadequate. Just last night I was staring blankly at 45 Photoshop pages that refused to do anything but kick my ass over and over. It reminded me that in an area that I should be nailing down to a science... I'm still basing most of what I do on superstitions.
     
    And so I present to you, the first 6 months of my adventure in Image Mastering. 
     
    So you'll need to take this post with a grain of salt. Do what works for you, and if you find strong evidence that I'm wrong, please tell me in the comments so I don't keep making the same mistakes!
     
    That said, I've spent dozens of hours researching this, and I've been doing it for the last 6 months, so unless you're professionally trained, you should probably just shut up and do it the way I say. :) It's a topic that seems straight forward enough: you're just saving out jpegs right? But the reality is a that it's a multi-disciplinary technical endeavor with a dozen things that can go wrong.
     
    Image Mastering is the name I've given to the last step of our comic creation process. It involves bringing all the art, text, and technology behind Carpe Chaos into one cohesive whole. The end goal is to ensure that all our hard work comes through in the most absolute crystal-clear perfection that we can muster. I'll hit each area that I've identified individually, and I think that will highlight how many ways this process can go wrong.
     
    sdadasdLast month's post on the art of our comic wasn't so hard to write. It was an opportunity to throw out some of our in-progress images and document what we've been doing for 4 years.
     
    This post however... makes me feel rather inadequate. Just last night I was staring blankly at 45 Photoshop pages that refused to do anything but kick my ass over and over. It reminded me that in an area that I should be nailing down to a science... I'm still basing most of what I do on superstitions.
     
    And so I present to you, the first 6 months of my adventure in Image Mastering. 
     
    So you'll need to take this post with a grain of salt. Do what works for you, and if you find strong evidence that I'm wrong, please tell me in the comments so I don't keep making the same mistakes!
     
    That said, I've spent dozens of hours researching this, and I've been doing it for the last 6 months, so unless you're professionally trained, you should probably just shut up and do it the way I say. :) It's a topic that seems straight forward enough: you're just saving out jpegs right? But the reality is a that it's a multi-disciplinary technical endeavor with a dozen things that can go wrong.
     
    Image Mastering is the name I've given to the last step of our comic creation process. It involves bringing all the art, text, and technology behind Carpe Chaos into one cohesive whole. The end goal is to ensure that all our hard work comes through in the most absolute crystal-clear perfection that we can muster. I'll hit each area that I've identified individually, and I think that will highlight how many ways this process can go wrong.
     
    Last month's post on the art of our comic wasn't so hard to write. It was an opportunity to throw out some of our in-progress images and document what we've been doing for 4 years.
     
    This post however... makes me feel rather inadequate. Just last night I was staring blankly at 45 Photoshop pages that refused to do anything but kick my ass over and over. It reminded me that in an area that I should be nailing down to a science... I'm still basing most of what I do on superstitions.
     
    And so I present to you, the first 6 months of my adventure in Image Mastering. 
     
    So you'll need to take this post with a grain of salt. Do what works for you, and if you find strong evidence that I'm wrong, please tell me in the comments so I don't keep making the same mistakes!
     
    That said, I've spent dozens of hours researching this, and I've been doing it for the last 6 months, so unless you're professionally trained, you should probably just shut up and do it the way I say. :) It's a topic that seems straight forward enough: you're just saving out jpegs right? But the reality is a that it's a multi-disciplinary technical endeavor with a dozen things that can go wrong.
     
    Image Mastering is the name I've given to the last step of our comic creation process. It involves bringing all the art, text, and technology behind Carpe Chaos into one cohesive whole. The end goal is to ensure that all our hard work comes through in the most absolute crystal-clear perfection that we can muster. I'll hit each area that I've identified individually, and I think that will highlight how many ways this process can go wrong.
     
    Last month's post on the art of our comic wasn't so hard to write. It was an opportunity to throw out some of our in-progress images and document what we've been doing for 4 years.
     
    This post however... makes me feel rather inadequate. Just last night I was staring blankly at 45 Photoshop pages that refused to do anything but kick my ass over and over. It reminded me that in an area that I should be nailing down to a science... I'm still basing most of what I do on superstitions.
     
    And so I present to you, the first 6 months of my adventure in Image Mastering. 
     
    So you'll need to take this post with a grain of salt. Do what works for you, and if you find strong evidence that I'm wrong, please tell me in the comments so I don't keep making the same mistakes!
     
    That said, I've spent dozens of hours researching this, and I've been doing it for the last 6 months, so unless you're professionally trained, you should probably just shut up and do it the way I say. :) It's a topic that seems straight forward enough: you're just saving out jpegs right? But the reality is a that it's a multi-disciplinary technical endeavor with a dozen things that can go wrong.
     
    Image Mastering is the name I've given to the last step of our comic creation process. It involves bringing all the art, text, and technology behind Carpe Chaos into one cohesive whole. The end goal is to ensure that all our hard work comes through in the most absolute crystal-clear perfection that we can muster. I'll hit each area that I've identified individually, and I think that will highlight how many ways this process can go wrong.

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This blog records the adventures we have making Carpe Chaos!

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